Bruce Lee Movie Stars a White Guy Because Of Course it Does

Because of course… I was already heart broken when they decided to have a becky feature as Major Motoko Kusanagi in Ghost in the Shell… which is fiction. Now to have the story of Bruce Lee told à la The Last Samurai??? God have mercy on my soul…

thenerdsofcolor

This morning, Deadline unveiled the first trailer for Birth of the Dragon, which recently made its debut at the Toronto International Film Festival. Ostensibly, the film depicts the legendary fight between Bruce Lee (played by Philip Ng) and Wong Jack Man (Yu Xia). But because this is Hollywood, the movie is going to be told from the perspective of a white dude.

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Where I Stand 24/05/2016

If you ever want to read a white South African’s arguments – using white authors – to derail and undermine Fanon, here is a read. His entire post is basically a justification for his statement that: “We white South Africans are, for better or worse, no longer settlers, we are natives”, an attempt at claiming to belong by virtue of how they feel, rather than historic and current contexts. It is an insight into the mind of someone who seeks to dismiss without engaging the history of his own white privilege.

A critique of Fanon of course can be valid, but from entrenched whiteness it becomes merely a derailment.

Matthew Blackman

With all of the Frantz Fanon worship going around I thought that I would finally read The Wretched of the Earth cover-to-cover – rather than just dealing with the chapters one is dished out at universities.  Having just got through that incendiary horse manure that Sartre placed at the front of it, the experience is going well, although I do not agree with his Hegelian inspired dialectical approach.  One issue that is interesting from where I stand is Fanon’s take on ‘the settler’.  As he says: ‘from the moment that the colonial context disappears, [the settler] has no longer any interest in remaining and coexisting.’  He goes on to argue that the settlers only frame their lives through their metropolitan centre and that the pied-noir Algerian ‘liberals’ wanted a twofold citizenship. Furthermore that the settlers claim that ‘the land was created by us’ and that ‘if we leave, all is…

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Once upon a time… Marvel created “The white nation of Azania”

Azania_001.jpgTo those in South Africa, especially those who have been involved in the recent fallist movements as well as those who know South African history, this might seem a bit of a contradiction: “The white nation of Azania“. Yes, once upon a time, Marvel created the fictional “white African nation of Azania” in its multiverse. It was a nation of white supremacists that bordered the fictional Kingdom of Wakanda, the homeland of the Black Panther, aka T’Challa. It even had its own team of superhumans, called “The Supremacists”. And yes, the creators based it on, then, apartheid South Africa. As the Black Panther has been formally introduced in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and because he has always been one of my favourite superheroes – in times long before superheroes were “cool”, it would be interesting to look back at this forgotten part of Marvel history. It is so forgotten that it doesn’t even have a Wikipedia page… (contrast Wakanda, which has a page too long to deal with).

Black_Panther_Vol_2_2This white supremacist version of Azania first featured in Vol 2 Issue 1 of the Black Panther, in 1988. Obviously as some sort of political statement by Marvel regarding the South African apartheid regime. The names of the team members of the “Supremacists” are just clear in every way: led by the White Avenger, it even had a member called Voortrekker, a white Zimbabwean who chose to fight for the white supremacist Azania. It is an absolute hilarity really that Marvel created this fictional country, and even replicated the struggle against apartheid through the conflict between “Azania” and Wakanda… Wakanda supposedly imposing sanctions on Azania and this leading to conflict between the two nations. The “great spirit of the Black Panther” even inspired the “poor masses” to revolt against the apartheid government of “Azania”, masses that were then accused of being supported by communists by the right wing “Azanian” government…

supremacists_azania001.jpg

In its 4 issue arc, the Black Panther eventually defeated the Supremacists and they were imprisoned in Wakanda. I’m not sure what happened to “Azania” in the official canon of Earth 616 of the Marvel universe, I think it kinda became a forgotten part that was never revisited. There are some more interesting tidbits actually. For example, the “Great spirit of the Black Panther” disagreed with the approach T’Challa took of sanctions, divorced him and possessed a Black man in “Azania” who then went on a rampage murdering white real estate agents, clergy, and the governor. Eventually T’Challa had to battle the man possessed by the spirit (who then had turned into a sort of were-creature) in order to reclaim the Black Panther spirit for himself. Overall the analogy is clear in the fight between the “spiritual nation of Wakanda” against the “white supremacist Azania”, but also in the way the Black Panther had to fight against the were-creature that was killing the white elite of this “Azania”… Somewhere, APLA soldiers must be turning in their graves at how the name of Azania has been used, and the subtext at how they were portrayed. The political commentary was anti-apartheid but filled with T’Challa as the mystical Mandela-like figure that not only tried to curb the apartheid governement but also stop the “evil” APLA-like force that waged an all out war against white supremacy.

Perhaps it gives some food of thought for the upcoming Black Panther movie? While I have, since childhood, enjoyed Marvel comics, looking back I am more and more seeing problematic issues that I previously didn’t pick up on. Furthermore, the Marvel Cinematic Universe is unfortunately not free of this…

 

 

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Taking a pass on “passing”

I don’t pass. That is a simple fact of my life. As a trans woman, I simply don’t pass, and really, I’ve stopped both trying to and caring about it. Overall, I get “read” – on initial encounter – about 50/50; meaning, 50 percent of the time I get a rude “are you a man?” while for the remainder I get a rude “are you a woman?” If such question isn’t stated out loud, it is usually visible in the way people’s brain visible starts to short circuit when they say Sir/Miss when addressing me.

When I started my “transition” it was still in a very medicalised system (or cis-stem) where I was diagnosed with “gender identity disorder” and was subjected to psychological tests as well as a “real-life test”. Essentially the entire process was focused on making as “real” a woman as possible… For years I tried to conform to that, convinced that the psychologists and doctors were right, that there was something wrong with me that could only be fixed by trying to conform to i.e. cisgender womanhood as closely as possible. It is only logical that this has affected me in many ways; however, one thing I have come to terms with is this: I don’t pass, I don’t need to, and I don’t want to. The problem is, society doesn’t see eye to eye on this at all.

One example, and one of the most irritating things, is how I am complimented. Now, I know this sounds strange, but hear me out. In general terms, I like compliments as much as anyone else, but the specificity of how and when those compliments come irks me often. Somehow, when it comes to compliments about how I look, they are always made in relation to femininity specifically. “Hey, you’re looking nice in that dress today” or “wow, you’re wearing make up! You look great!”… Well, especially when you consider that I don’t really wear dresses that often, and – these days – almost never make up, just kinda is the point. I never hear “oh, those baggy jeans make you look great”, the only compliment about jeans I hear is when it’s skinny, feminine cut jeans… Somehow, there is an assumption that anything “masculine” is inherently something I don’t like, that the very fact that I am a trans woman means that I am looking to be the beautiful-carboard-cutout-disney-princess (I really don’t)… Well, maybe the crossdressing-sword-wielding-Mulan if she said “fuck you, you patriarch” to Captain Li Shang. The point is, just because I am a trans woman doesn’t mean I seek to conform to gender roles and norms, just because I am a trans woman doesn’t mean I can’t be gender non-conforming* in various ways, and flourish in that non-conformity. And just because i don’t conform to typical gender roles and norms doesn’t mean you can disregard that I am in fact a woman; sure, a trans woman, but still: a w-o-m-a-n.

When it comes to trans women, even the most progressive of feminists tend to have narrow standards of “womanhood”… Somehow, people often expect us to prove our transness or womanness by conforming to some sort of checklist from the 70s, while the butchest of lesbians would not be questions as such by those same progressives. The double standard is what is suffocating, and it is perpetuated by a constant narrative around transgender people regarding “transition” and such that are really rooted in oppressive understandings of gender.

Recently, with all the rhetoric on “bathroom bills” in the USA, I’ve seen a lot of problematic language. There is a lot of “do you want to have me in your bathroom” with pictures of trans people who “pass” (meaning, conform to a cisgender understanding of what the gender they identify with is suppose to look like) to counter these bills. I keep thinking that either way, whether I enter the women’s OR men’s bathroom, it doesn’t make a damn difference… because “passing” ain’t remotely something I approach, it is always a 50/50 depending on what I ended up wearing that day, and trying to avoid speaking or waiting in lines when bathrooms are crowded cause too much scrutiny and you’d think they were filming “Scream 5.voetsek” in said bathroom… And this is the thing, I don’t want my rights to depend on whether I can pass or not, whether I conform or not… And this is where rethoric is leading to when it comes to transgender issues… And this is not just about trans people, but anyone who is gender non-conforming.

What the irony is truly, is that I’ve had such issues from other trans women as well… And this is sometimes truly mindboggling… I have had the “you’re not trans enough” or “why are you dressed like that” from other trans women when I show up looking more like Jet-Li-with-long-hair than anything else, and still insist in calling myself a trans woman. And in this I question how we talk about trans issues… an issue that is even further amplified for those non-binary trans people. We need to critically engage with both gender in wider society, as well as the history of transgender issues in general. We need to understand how a lot of the narrative around trans people was created to enforce gender roles and norms, rather than challenge them.

P.S: this is not an opening for TERFs to start trans-bashing… really it is the opposite…

 

* I know that the definition of gender non-conforming is diverse, and some people have argued that it i.e. is a separate identity that is separate from trans woman or trans man. Then others say it simply refers to gender non-conformity which is broader, and make distinctions between that and non-binary trans people’s specific identity. I am not seeking to impose a definition, but I do want to clarify how I am using the term here. Wandile Dlamini, a non-binary trans activist and friend of mine, always emphasises the latter definition of gender non-conforming, and I tend to agree with them.

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On the patriarchal appropriation of Fallism and violent masculinity

Today, at Whites – I mean Wits – University, after a “secret” #FeesMustFall meeting of supposed “leaders” of the movement, Chumani Maxwele assaulted a Black Queer Woman and tried to strangle her… This “RMF Jesus”, as he has been positioned by aboKasibe, is out of control. He is not a representative of Rhodes Must Fall at this meeting, as cadres at RMF had enough with his patriarchal violence. I don’t know who decided to invite him, but dololo transparency, we just found out he was there representing RMF.
Let me be clear: UCT: Rhodes Must Fall put forward three pillars that are central to the movement: Black Consciousness, Pan-Africanism, and BLACK FEMINISM… Now to hear that cisgender heterosexual patriarchs are saying the Fallist revolution is not feminist and does not care about queer bodies is revisionist appropriation of the politics that we all committed to. This is not a debate, this is a fight for survival.

To those patriarchs who shout “but CLASS” everytime we raise the fact that we cannot breath amids the sexual harrassment and assaults from “comrades”, the trans and queer antagonism, and the violent masculinities… I say THIS: you cannot approach the class issue without a gendered critique, and you cannot approach the gender issue with a class analysis. You are simply using class to derail any conversation about cisgender, heterosexual, male privilege! This in itself is a disservice to the important class issues that still we need to deal with! And as a former sex worker – street walker and homeless person – I tell you: do not make assumptions about our backgrounds and our lives simply to silence us!

To those crying out: “stop the oppression olympics”, every time we point out the burden that we face both outside and within our movement… It is of interest to me that you cry “oppression olympics” only when it is you who is falling behind… Oppression olympics is all you know, at least as long as you think you are ahead in the game. As Wandile Dlamini, a Trans activist and Fallist in the truest sense of the word, has pointed out: “Be consistent in your fuckery!”
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(Photocredit: UCT Trans Collective)

Chumani Maxwele, who has – ironically so – been lifted up on a pedestal by Wandile Kasibe and other patriarchs as Cecil Rhodes toppled from his, has committed sexual assault and harassment. So have many other “comrades” in Rhodes Must Fall and Fees Must Fall… We ask, justifiably so: Sixole kanjani? We have disrupted after #RapeAtAzania when a cisgender heterosexual man told women to “dress decently” in response the the rape of a comrade; we stood there bare breasted and demanded that they shut up and listen. We expelled cisgender men from Azania house after, again, the existence of this violent patriarchy was denied. The UCT Trans Collective disrupted the RMF Expo that celebrated the cis het male gaze. And now? What is next?
The patriarchal appropriation of Fallism is painful, as it was those of us whose bodies are the most easily discarded that put them on the line. I will not back down, if they want to make good on the threats they make to “take care” of us… I will not be silent… I see the silence of those who so often claim to be cis het male “allies” to us queer and trans women, to the non-binary people… I see their complicity… At the protest at wits women from EFF beat up Chumani after he assaulted the queer woman, and I say here: we are led! Makuliwe! #1Patriarch10Sjamboks
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When Myths Become Truths and confusion is the order of the day

In light of the recent conflicts in the Fallist movements, due to the appropriation of cisgender patriarchs who seem to have forgotten the three pillars of Rhodes Must Fall: Black Consciousness, Pan-Africanism, BLACK FEMINISM… Let it be clear that I will neither rest, nor be silent… Not after putting my trans body on the line in ways that cisgender men will never understand. So please cis male “allies” in the Fallist ranks: educate your own!

lindokuhlethefirst's Blog

In a journal article earlier this year Achille Mbembe wrote the following

“the questions we face are of a profoundly intellectual nature. They are also colossal. And if we do not foreground them intellectually in the first instance; if we do not develop a complex understanding of the nature of what we are actually facing, we will end up with the same old techno-bureaucratic fixes that have led us, in the first place, to the current cul-desac.”

Lately I have heard comrades who I deeply admire blame the problems that we face on feminism. It is said that feminism is the death of our revolution. I therefore took the time to debunk such theories before they become the undisputed truths in our circles. It is important that in our analysis of the revolution we are not lazy to go to the deep intellectual dungeons.

From my analysis of the black…

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Armed struggle: What must now happen?

When thinking about the continuing militarisation of universities across South Africa, the justifications used for such militarisation must be questioned. Private security in South Africa, as the author points out, have become an “armed wing” of the privileged…

onestabwrites

I was at a talk the other day where a PAC/APLA veteran spoke at the District 6 museum. It was disappointing for a number of reasons but one thing that he said struck me in particular.

He said that the armed struggle is over.

That statement in particular struck a chord because I had been, before then, been thinking about some things related to the concept of armed struggle in contemporary South Africa. That statement and its sentiment highlighted exactly the dynamics I had been thinking about and was trying to subvert…

True, the ‘armed struggle’ in the way that it was thought and fought in late apartheid is over. But surely we are blinding ourselves to a whole lot of realities if we take that statement as truth?

We live in a highly militarised society. People are armed. Certain people are armed.

Cast our minds back to 2012 when…

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